Jewish Journal Uses F-Word

Naomi Pfefferman writes:

Saget’s stand-up, in his words, has always been "perverted," but that did not become widely known until he was asked to appear in the 2005 documentary, "The Aristocrats," in which he out-raunched 100 other comedians. Since then, Saget has sold out stadiums and college theaters with an act so over-the-top nasty that it is outrageous even in a comedy zeitgeist already pushed to Sarah Silverman extremes.

His stream-of-consciousness riffs about incest, date rape, snuff films, bestiality and every possible bodily fluid are "a word salad of language so blisteringly blue that a potential diagnosis, as Saget freely admits on HBO, of Tourette’s syndrome cannot be ruled out," the Washington Post said.

The promos for his Comedy Central roast feature Saget admonishing a donkey for trying to sniff his privates.

Even when he’s riffing about his synagogue, Kehillat Israel in Pacific Palisades, an animal somehow enters the picture.

"We have a great synagogue the rabbi will marry a man to a goat," he said. "It’s Reconstructionist they’ll do gay marriage if you need it, they’ll do interfaith and interfaith’s nothing after a goat."

Saget also has the reputation, among those who know him, to be as kind as he can be crude. A few days after the taping of his Comedy Central roast, he publicly protested the vulgar Olsen jokes proffered by roast master John Stamos (another "Full House" co-star) and dais participants, such as Gilbert Gottfried.

"Anybody who talks about my TV kids that upsets me," Saget said in a statement. "I am very protective. I love them very, very much."

Saget was more measured about the roast several days later: "Some of the comedy for sure crossed the line," he said in an e-mail. "It’s a roast, and they went for it. I also believe in freedom of speech, and the comedians meant no harm."

Saget said he gets to look at the final edit and that "Comedy Central has been incredibly collaborative. The director-producer, Joel Gallen, is very talented … and also has helped to talk me off of ledges over many aspects of this roast.

"I think it’s a very funny show, but it’s not for everyone," he added, delicately."

Saget’s Kehillat Israel shows are far cleaner. He joined the congregation with his ex-wife, Sherri, in 1990, and their three daughters (now ages 15 to 21) had their bat mitzvahs there.

The synagogue’s rabbi, Steven Carr Reuben, is a fan: "Bob has appeared at almost every major event we’ve hosted in the last 15 years," he said. "He once admitted to me that temple shows are the hardest to do, because he has to censor himself.

"Bob is particularly funny because he has this dual, schizophrenic reputation from the G-rated family shows to the X-rated stand-up show," the rabbi added. "I appreciate his humor, because I know where it comes from: a sweet and loving way of communicating with people.

"Some comedy is cutting, but Bob’s humor is always designed for us to see the funny side of ourselves in difficult situations. He’ll be in the hospital visiting someone and making a joke about people’s catheters. It’s uncomfortable but funny, too."

About Luke Ford

I've written five books (see Amazon.com). My work has been followed by the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and 60 Minutes. I teach Alexander Technique in Beverly Hills (Alexander90210.com).
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