Category Archives: Janet Malcolm

‘A trial jury is like an audience at a play that wants to be entertained’

Janet Malcolm writes: Ten years earlier I had published a two-part article in The New Yorker about a disturbance in an obscure corner of the psychoanalytic world whose chief subject, a man named Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, hadn’t liked his portrayal … Continue reading

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The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes

Janet Malcolm writes in this 1995 book: * Strangers who Hughes feels know nothing about his marriage to Plath write about it with proprietary authority. “I hope each of us owns the facts of her or his own life,” Hughes … Continue reading

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Iphigenia: Anatomy of a Murder Trial

Here are some excerpts from this 2011 Janet Malcolm book: * What they say in their opening statements is decisive, of course. If we understand that a trial is a contest between competing narratives, we can see the importance of … Continue reading

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