Oriental Vs American Thinking

From Wikipedia’s entry on Frank Capra:

In January 1952, the U.S. Ambassador to India asked Capra to represent the U.S. film industry at an International Film Festival to be held in India. A State Department friend of Capra asked him and explained why his trip would be important:

“[Ambassador] Bowles thinks the Festival is a Communist shenanigan of some kind, but he doesn’t know what … Bowles has asked for you. “I want a free-wheeling guy to take care of our interest on his own. I want Capra. His name is big here, and I’ve heard he’s quick on his feet in an alley fight.”[42]

After two weeks in India, Capra discovered that Bowles’ fears were warranted, as many film sessions were used by Russian and Chinese representatives to give long political speeches. At a lunch with 15 Indian directors and producers, he stressed that “they must preserve freedom as artists, and that any government control would hinder that freedom. A totalitarian system – and they would become nothing but publicity men for the party in power.” Capra had a difficult time communicating this, however, as he noted in his diary:

“They all think some super-government or super-collection of individuals dictates all American pictures. Free enterprise is mystery to them. Somebody must control, either visible or invisible … Even intellectuals have no great understanding of liberty and freedom … Democracy is only a theory to them. They have no idea of service to others, of service to the poor. The poor are despised, in a sense.”

About Luke Ford

I've written five books (see Amazon.com). My work has been followed by the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and 60 Minutes. I teach Alexander Technique in Beverly Hills (Alexander90210.com).
This entry was posted in America, India. Bookmark the permalink.