E. Michael Jones on Harvey Weinstein

Rhondda writes:

I am not a Catholic, or even a Christian, even though I was brought up in a liberal Protestant church, but sometimes I do appreciate E. Michael Jones for his insights about people. His latest discussion on YouTube about Harvey Weinstein is particularly interesting, as he declares Harvey to be the official scapegoat for Jewish Hollywood. The idea of the scapegoat is an old Jewish custom. The people would gather and place all their sins upon the goat, and then the goat would be killed or sent out into the desert to die. The people then could go about their business free of guilt.

Basically Jones is arguing that Harvey was being a good Jew. He was seducing and befouling shiksas, which is a derogatory term for non-Jewish women, and undermining the goyim’s morals and way of life in his movies. This is their revenge for all the humiliations and insults they have endured forever at the hands of white people. So why is he the Hollywood scapegoat when he has been such a good Jew? Well, he was the best one at it, I suppose. It is not a sacrifice if you don’t hand over the best.

The most interesting part of Jones’ argument is about the white starlets whom he “victimized.” Their shame is demonstrated by this display of victimization where each of them denounces him now, but not when it allegedly happened. Each one of these fame-obsessed women went on to star in a movie, and particularly by taking of her clothes, and some even got starring roles in holocaust porn. He calls out in particular Kate Winslet, who won an Oscar for her role in the holocaust movie The Reader where an older woman seduces a 15-year-old boy. Now, where is the shame?

Her meeting with Harvey.
Taking off her clothes in a movie.
Seducing a child in a movie.
Playing a “bad” white in a holocaust movie.
Getting an Oscar for submitting to Harvey and getting an Oscar for playing a pedophile in a holocaust movie.

If movies are to have effects upon the audience, what effect does it have on the actors? Oh, someone got these career-obsessed women to totally debase themselves as white women, hence their shame and guilt and the projection upon poor old Harvey who was just being a good Jew. After all, as Jones stated, the Simon Wiesenthal Center has not taken back his Humanitarian award which he won just two years ago in 2015. He is a good Jew, and an outstanding member of the tribe. However, the tribe needs a scapegoat, and so he loses all those other awards and status. I am sure a good Jewish therapist will help him cope.

This reminds me of Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery,” which was first published in The New Yorker in 1948. People were so outraged that they cancelled subscriptions and wrote nasty letters. It is a wonderful story and everyone should read it. It is only eight pages.

The other interesting tidbit that Jones discusses is that the relaxation of censorship laws in movies was first allowed for holocaust porn movies. From there, it is anything goes. He also talks about the book Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth, where the Jewish obsessional fantasy with sex with white women is thoroughly discussed. I have heard it called the adolescent’s bible.

Jones segues into a discussion of gay pride parades by means of the allegations of males who had been abused by older men when they were young, which would be pedophilia, and actually not just homosexual pedophiles, but he does not say that. He thinks gay pride parades are also a demonstration of shame for their behavior by exaggerating it and performing in public and demanding public acceptance.

If Jones’s theory is correct, we can apply it to feminists, who insist that women who have been raped and beaten by immigrants or refugees keep quiet about it and don’t rock the boat of equality and multiculturalism. It seems to me that this is the height of hypocrisy, for the women’s movement was supposed to be about improving the lives of women and they scream about rape culture. So what is going on? Where is the shame? If you have invested your whole life in an ideal that has been hijacked by another group and you are getting rewards and a good career, how do you declare that it has proven to be a failure and actually wrong without condemning yourself and all the time and investment you have put into it? They don’t. They go along with the new game plan and find rationalizations to deceive themselves. This is the feminist double-down syndrome. However, they have effectively betrayed the actual victims of crime who were supposed to be the women whose lives they were to improve. Their hysterics about the poor refugees is how they disguise their shame and totally befuddles any thinking person. It is very hard to admit shame in a shameless society when shamelessness is rewarded by others who do not want to admit it to themselves either. The bikini or the burka becomes the amusing dichotomy for feminist as movies about sexual abuse of fifteen-year-olds are presented as attractive, and stories about women taking refugees as lovers proliferate in social media. Sexual shame exists, and denying it just makes it worse for everyone. In a moral society, discernment and discretion also exist. I believe there is a tribe who do not care or think about this and advocate transgression in every aspect of life, especially the lives of normal white people who feel confused and degraded.

According to the ADL:

E. Michael Jones is a Catholic writer who seeks to defend traditional Catholic teachings and values from
those he perceives as seeking to undermine them. At various times such diverse groups as Protestants,
urban planners, and moviemakers have been the subjects of his ire, but a longstanding obsession of Jones is
the damage that he believes Jews are inflicting on the Catholic Church and western civilization.
IDEOLOGY
E. Michael Jones is an anti-Semitic Catholic writer who promotes the view that Jews are dedicated to
propagating and perpetrating attacks on the Catholic Church and moral standards, social stability, and
political order throughout the world. He portrays the Jewish religion as inherently treacherous and
belligerent towards Christianity. He describes Jews as “outlaws and subversives [who use] religion as a
cover for social revolution,” and claims that Judaism possesses “a particularly malignant spirit.” Jones also
imagines the contemporary world, with its social ills, as having been cast in the imprint of Judaism,
characterizing 21st-century civilization as “a Jewish world run on commercial principles.” He also identifies
this “Jewish modernity” as representing “blood, the law, calculation, and hate.”
In the tradition of conspiracy theorists, Jones credits Jews with orchestrating occurrences as varied and
disconnected from the Jewish experience as the Protestant Reformation and the French Revolution. He also
blames Jews for Bolshevism, Freemasonry, and an alleged contemporary “Jewish takeover of American
culture.” Jones reaches for tenuous connections to paint “the Jews” as inherently wicked and prone to
colluding openly or secretly to threaten other populations around them.
Jones argues that mass killings of Jews throughout history have been understandable reactions to Jewish
beliefs and behavior. He goes so far as to justify Eastern European pogroms and even the Nazi Holocaust on
these grounds. As he wrote in a 2003 Culture Wars article, “[T]he Nazi attempt to exterminate the Jews was
a reaction to Jewish Messianism (in the form of Bolshevism) every bit as much as the Chmielnicki pogroms
flowed from the excesses of the Jewish tax farmers in the Ukraine.”
Jones’ views are not limited to religious Jews. He applies his theory of Jewish subversiveness to Jews of all
ideological and religious stripes, from traditional rabbis and political conservatives to militant atheists and
Marxists. For Jones, any Jew who does not embrace Christianity rejects God and the natural order of the
universe. Jones therefore concludes unambiguously that “every Christian, insofar as he is a Christian, must
be anti-Jewish.”
Jones’ anti-Semitic writings are premised on the idea that Catholic doctrine obligates the faithful to oppose
Judaism, regardless of the behavior of individual Jews. The Vatican and most Catholics have thoroughly
repudiated anti-Semitism, but Jones still declares himself to be a defender of normative Catholic teachings.
Jones’ contention that his beliefs have theological foundations may give him a degree of legitimacy among
some Catholics who would otherwise be dismissive of his extremist conclusions.

Writing on the controversy surrounding Holocaust-denying Bishop Richard Williamson of the ultratraditionalist
Society of St. Pius X, Jones criticizes the Vatican’s condemnation of Williamson’s words: “the
Church can have unity or she can have good relations with the Jews, but she can’t have both.” Jones herein
expresses his ideological opposition to anything Jewish; although he does not deny the Holocaust himself,
he believes that the Church must at all times oppose Jewry and must not acknowledge Jewish grievances
even when valid.
BACKGROUND: JONES’ JOURNEY TO EXTREMISM
After growing up in a working-class neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa., Jones came to promote anti-Semitic
conspiracy theories following a tumultuous personal journey beginning in his early adult years. According
to autobiographical sources, Jones initially abandoned the Catholic faith of his upbringing at age 20,
embraced the counterculture of the 1960s, and spent his honeymoon stuck in traffic on the way to the
Woodstock music festival. In the 1970s, Jones spent time in a rural area of Germany teaching English. Jones
reconnected with Catholicism while living in Germany, and also became concerned with the loss of ethnic
and religious traditions in the West. Upon his return to the United States, he earned a Ph.D. in American
history and literature from Temple University and then assumed a position as assistant professor of
American Literature at St. Mary’s College, a Catholic women’s school in South Bend, Indiana, from which he
was quickly fired. Jones claims that he was dismissed from this job because of his outspoken opposition to
abortion.
In 1981, Jones founded Fidelity magazine as a platform for Catholics who believed that “modernity” and the
liberal Church were having a destructive impact upon popular culture and traditional religious
communities. In his early books such as The Slaughter of Cities, Jones railed against what he viewed to be
the disintegration of immigrant Catholic neighborhoods. He blamed a Protestant-WASP elite, and to a lesser
extent Jews, for seeking to dominate Catholic populations and to facilitate the decay of the spiritual and
geographic foundations of their faith. In following years, Jones increasingly focused his claims on Jews as
the main foreign population attempting to harm the wellbeing of Catholic communities. He published
numerous articles in his magazine, renamed Culture Wars in 1996, about an alleged Jewish conspiracy to
undermine not only the Catholic faith but also American society through social, political, cultural, and
economic subversion. Many of these pieces would later be republished in a recent book entitled The Jewish
Revolutionary Spirit, linked together to create the portrait of a people seeking worldwide social and
political instability in the hopes of harming society’s moral core.
In addition to his published writings, Jones has also expressed intolerant views in a CD that he released in
2003 entitled “Watching MTV: Neoethnic Songs and Dances.” The album includes an anti-Jewish song
entitled “Fear the Jews,” as well as other songs with homophobic and anti-Semitic lyrics authored by Jones.
JONES AND THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
The position that Jones articulates about Judaism is one that does not enjoy the support of the Catholic
Church, and his views are considered to be extreme even in staunchly traditionalist circles. Many Catholics
have denounced Jones’ bigoted rhetoric and exploitation of Catholic teachings for his own purposes.
Responding to his participation on a panel in Prague in September 2006, Cardinal Miloslav Vlk, Archbishop
of Prague, released a statement criticizing Jones for his outreach to “political extremists, Lefebvrites,
nationalists, anti-Semites, Islamists and neo-Nazis.” In 2004, the Catholic League for Religious and Civil
Rights “unequivocally condemned” Jones for his anti-Semitism and denounced “his efforts to justify it in the
name of Catholic theology.” It also strongly criticized Jones for “outrageously blam[ing] the Jews themselves
for the Holocaust and pogroms.”
EXTREMIST AFFILIATIONS
In his writings, Jones takes pains to clarify that his views on Jews are not based on racial theories, and
that he is “anti-Jewish” but not “anti-Semitic”. Nevertheless, he courts individuals on the extremist
fringe of American society whose racism, anti-Semitism, and xenophobia is unmistakable. Jones’ book
The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit cites such bigoted sources as Holocaust denier Michael A. Hoffman II
and anti-Semitic ideologue Professor Kevin MacDonald. To market The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit,
Jones has also sought the support of extremist, conspiracy-theorist radio and television hosts such as
Hesham Tillawi, Henry Makow, and Peter Schaenk. Alex Linder featured the book on his virulently
racist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic internet radio program Radio Istina. The radio program is
broadcast on Linder’s Vanguard News Network, a white supremacist website whose slogan is “No Jews.
Just Right.” Jones has also formed working relationship with the far-left anti-Semitic writer Israel
Shamir, a Russian-born Jewish convert to Christianity. Jones’ extremist associations, and the support he
enjoys among the radical fringe, underscore his hateful message.

E. Michael Jones wrote in 2003:

I never liked the title of Rabbi Dresner’s book. It was called Can Families Survive in Pagan America? and was published in 1995 by Huntington House out of Lafayettte, Louisiana. I got a copy just as I was starting Culture Wars, a magazine that ran concurrently with Fidelity and eventually superseded it. I liked Dresner’s book because it fit in perfectly with the idea of Culture Wars at the time. Both the magazine and the book were meditations on the moral basis for America, which as anyone who is familiar with American history knows, is the only basis for America. Rabbi Dresner’s take on the American experiment in ordered liberty was essentially the same as that of John Adams, Alexis de Tocqueville, and John Courtney Murray. We, John Adams wrote concerning the citizens of the nation he had been instrumental in bringing into being, have no constitution that functions in the absence of a moral people. According to Dresner’s reading of the American experiment in ordered liberty:

The founding fathers of America, taking the biblical record as their model, knew that political democracy could only flourish if established on the dual foundations of faith and family. Our contemporary malaise is the consequence of abandoning that ideal in favor of a society that is largely secular, hedonistic and atomistic. Judaism, by advocating a God-centered family-based society , established by the covenant and governed by the Torah can play a key role in recalling America to its origins (Families, p. 77).

As a result of the decadence which has dominated American cultural life since the 60s, sexually degenerate America needed, in Dresner’s view, a new coalition, a union of Jews and Gentiles with a common commitment to civilization and a common abhorrence of social and moral chaos.

Families was an American book, but it was different than the plethora of jeremiads about the moral decline of America in the Bill Bennett mode. Dresner’s book was about something else. It had a subtext that escaped its title. Families was really about American Jews, or, better, the effect that America had had on the Jews who came here largely in the aftermath of the Russian pogroms of the 1880s. Families was about how many modern Jews, in their search for passion and pleasure and power, have lost themselves in the kingdom of Caesar. It was about the ironies which abounded when one compared the strictures of the Torah and the mores of contemporary American Jews. Is it not ironic, Dresner asked rhetorically, that the descendants of the those who wrote the Psalms and offered prayer to the world became, according to all accountings, the least worshipful?

Like Culture Wars, Can Families Survive in Pagan America? was a deliberate attempt to step outside the normal ethnic and religious boundaries; but like Fidelity magazine, which preceded and eventually morphed into Culture Wars, it could not do this without addressing the intra-ethnic situation, which is to say, in this instance the state of American Jews. In addition to being about morals, Families was about ethnicity and its antinomy, assimilation, and Rabbi Dresner was, by and large, not happy with the American Jewish experience. The Jews had prospered in American, but they paid a price for their prosperity. The chosen people seemed to flatten into normality, according to Dresner’s pessimistic view, becoming what the prophets had warned against: like the nations. They had succeeded beyond their wildest dreams in assimilating and achieving success. They even succeeded in remaking American culture in the course of the 20th century in their image, but in doing that they also discovered that they were in some very real sense of the word, a sense which Dresner explored in detail, no longer Jews. Jews, according to Dresner, have tried all things. In the process they have exhausted modernity; and discovered to their chagrin; the puzzling truth that

No license has replaced the Law; no symphony, the Psalms, no chandelier, the Sabbath candles; no opera, Yom Kippur; not country club , the synagogue; no mansion, the home; no Jaguar, a child; no mistress, a wife; no banquet, the Passover seder; not towering metropolis, Jerusalem; no impulse, the joy of doing a mitzvah; no man, God. (p. 329).

Dresner carried the hope that American Jews would seek the recovery of the sacred to his grave when he died three years ago.

About Luke Ford

I've written five books (see Amazon.com). My work has been followed by the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and 60 Minutes. I teach Alexander Technique in Beverly Hills (Alexander90210.com).
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